News

RACING 14 SEP 2019

Posted by Terry Smith on September 18, 2019 at 8:50 AM Comments comments (0)

Be careful what you wish for!

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If you recall, last year there was a wind drought. We spent countless days commenting on how pretty the reflections were on the pond. It certainly didn't make for exciting racing but we got to brush up on light weather skills. Obviously we wished for more wind.

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This year we got more wind. Bucket loads more wind. At times the wind was so strong that it would have taken the wrinkles out of Camilla Parker-Bowles face. And so we wished for less wind.

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Come the A Class State Title, Adelaide was in the middle of a huge high pressure system and the weather bureau forecast was for 2 knots rising to 7 knots by three P.M. As it turned out, the wind was fairly light to start off with and improved earlier in the day than expected. Quite a few DNFs were recorded as boats were unable to make the cut-off times required as per RRS and the Sailing Instructions.

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The day was deemed a success with particular thanks to :-

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PRO                          Steve Arthur

Vice PRO                  Graham Alcock

Junior Vice PRO      David Draper

Junior Vice PRO      Bob Dare

Chef                          Bob Dare (don't tell his missus)

Caterer                      David Martin

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A big thank you to the 11 (yes, count them, 11) entrants who made for a great day with few if any aggravations. Well done guys.

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Huge congratulations to Tim Arland who took his fifth consecutive State Title with a score of 7 points. His score sheet would have been straight firsts had he not been pipped on Races 1 and 3 which became his discards. Tim has seen fit to retire from State Titles in order to give others a chance to win. Personally I don't agree with this philosophy as I believe that Champions are there to aspire to, learn from, and eventually beat. Tim is certainly a Champion and it is up to him to do as he feels best for himself and the sport. Thanks Tim for the past 5 years of lessons.

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David Martin took second place with 17 points. He was the only sailor to pip Tim Arland in Races 1 and 3. Well done David.

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Bronze was hotly contested by the Whites, per et fils, with fils sneaking ahead. Tony White took third with 21 points from dear old Dad, Peter, on 24 points.

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Fifth place, with 27 points went to Bob Whitehead with his new Gothica. This boat was the youngest design in the fleet and is sure to be a fixture as Bob and the boat get more time together.

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Jeff Watson campaigned a golden oldie to sixth place on 37 points. Shamrock is a 'Foo Fighter' that has been through the hands of Murray Pearce, Don Smith (who loaned her to Ben Morris who won the State Title back in ......), Brian Pennifold, Bob Tuohy, Steve Rosenberg and now Jeff. I think I am correct in saying that all of the previous owners have, at some stage, regretted selling Shamrock. She is the first A Class that I ever sailed and she is as sweet today as she was back then. I think that this title race day is only about the third or fourth time that Jeff has sailed her and so the combination should improve with time.

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Seventh place on 54 points went to Philip Scapens. This was fairly unusual for Philip. Usually he and 'Osprey' are up there giving the podium a shake but today things just didn't fire up.

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Chasing hard up on Osprey was Bob Tuohy and 'Wizzle Wozzle' on 55 points to take eigth place. 'Wizzle Wozzle' was first measured in 1990. Bob only had a quick half day introduction to her before the race day. You can't keep a good boat, or sailor, down.

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One point further back was Bob Watson taking ninth place with 56 points. I don't think Bob was particularly well that day. He was very quiet. VERY quiet. We suspect laryngitis.

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Bobbing around like a ruptured duck, Terry Smith came tenth with 57 points. A lack of 'water time' and some last minute changes ensured that I sailed with a total lack of elan, except for the first leg of the first race. Maybe I should have quit while I was ahead.

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Brian Pennifold rounded out the fleet in eleventh place with 84 points. It wouldn't be the same without Brian there. To me he is Mr A Class having introduced me to them by letting me have a sail of 'Shamrock' all those years ago. He had me hooked and they remain my primary love amongst the ARYA approved classes.

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I thank all officials, workers, competitors and spectators for making it a good day.

RESURRECTING THE YACHTS OF YORE

Posted by Terry Smith on August 6, 2019 at 6:35 PM Comments comments (1)

Hi guys, having problems here. I think Mrs Webs.com wants me to buy more space.

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Second try. The following was sent out to all clubs. I have no idea how big a response there will be, but there is no reason for SEHMYC members not to come with more modern boats. There is plenty of water.

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 photo invite 1_zpsvipywps0.jpg

 photo invite 2_zpsk8vdlfj6.jpg

The Titanic Award

Posted by Terry Smith on July 18, 2019 at 3:10 AM Comments comments (2)

You may not be aware that we have a Titanic Award. Last Year's winner was Bob Watson. The award shouldn't be won twice in a row because the current holder has to nominate the next year's winner. Of course, he could nominate himself if he tried hard enough.

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To the best of my recollection Bob has broken the A rig on his Marblehead four times this year. That's a pretty solid attempt to keep the prize in your own portfolio.

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There have been some other pretty valiant attempts to wrest it from Bob.

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Phillip Neville had his Marblehead in the water. This boat was just a super cheapy  that he was using while he completed his A Class boat. Don't rush him, this has been going on for 47 years. And you reckon I'm slow? Anyway, the Marblehead began to sit a bit lower in the water. And lower. And lower. It was in the general vicinity of where Roger's Marblehead, after being t-boned by Bob Tuohy's 10 Rater, sank years ago. Roger's boat went all the way to the bottom and was retrieved via dinghy and grappling hook. Phillip's boat just bobbed around with its' nose pointing  in the air. The amount of nose above water was diminishing rapidly. No time to get the dinghy from the shed. Phillip ripped his clothes off quicker than a gay bar stripper but entered the water somewhat slower than the dudes on Bondi Rescue. The water at that time of year was cold. Not just cold but COLD. Phillip emerged from the water, with boat, but wearing the family jewels as a bow-tie. Bet he doesn't do that again in a hurry.

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Then there are those who take a more laid back approach to boat recovery. Bob Dare's boat went NON COMPOS MENTIS and grounded itself over near Stanhouse Bay. Bob just sat back and watched the other boats sailing around. When asked if he was going to go get his boat, he replied that if he left it long enough it would probably drift back to our side of the dam. Next week would be good enough. Cool, calm and collect it when it wants to be collected.

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Philip Scapens..........oh deary me. Part way through an A Class race, Philip's transmitter started making beeping noises. It looked like his transmitter batteries may have been going flat. And, of course, his boat was half way across the dam towards Stanhouse Bay. We assured Philip that the batteries could be changed with only minimal loss of boat control while the receiver re-linked. Phillip started ripping batteries out and they flew through the air like spent bullet cases from a machine gun. New batteries in, wait, try to control boat, no response. Everyone, being in race mode, finished their race before going back to assist in shepherding Osprey back to shore. Too late. Osprey had driven itself into the only tree on the far bank and snarled the mast in the branches. Time for Philip to put his time-honed rowing skills to test. He got over to Osprey and had troubles untangling it from the tree. He eventually managed to clear it and then attached Osprey to the dinghy with a hawser. By this time Osprey had drifted back into the tree. Undaunted, Philip applied himself to the oars and endeavoured to retrieve his craft from the clutches of the tree by applying brute force. It worked. Osprey came free and followed the dinghy away from the tree. Unfortunately the freedom was accompanied with a resounding crack which coincided with the mast falling into the water. Osprey, the hull, floated along behind the dinghy with a bedraggled mess of mast, sail and rigging trailing along behind. On reaching the near shore the sorry shambles was removed from the water. Diagnosis revealed that the boat battery was OK. The new transmitter batteries were OK. The receiver would not lock on to the transmitter. Quote of the year from Philip. 'Does it matter that the transmitter is saying MR MAGOO?' Somehow he had managed to get the transmitter to go from the A Class 'Osprey' channel to his IOM, 'MR MAGOO'. Good one Philip.

COURTESY AND RESPECT

Posted by Terry Smith on July 8, 2019 at 8:35 AM Comments comments (0)

Hi guys,

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it has been brought to my notice that a degree of discourtesy/disrespect has crept into our sailing. I take full blame for this as I have failed to notice it while being distracted by other things in my personal life.

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The problem mainly occurs when we have a specific class sailing day - A Class, Marblehead etc.. On those occasions we ask other classes to please give the courtesy of 'room' to the day-specific class at buoys and in general sailing. This is purely as a courtesy not a hard and fast rule. At all times the sailing rules of the road still apply regardless of which fleet you are sailing in, and even if you are only sailing casually.

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We have a large disparity in the skills level of our sailors and those with more experience can become frustrated by those with less water-years under their belt. It is my view that the more skilled sailors have a duty of courtesy to the up-coming sailors of politely showing how conflicts can best be avoided and what actions would best fit the 'courtesy' model. Berating other sailors for real or supposed transgressions can only lead to ill-will. A little advice in a timely manner must be to the benefit of all and the sport in general.

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Respect and Courtesy are both two way streets. If the older sailors give the respect/courtesy of coaching others out of awkward situations, and newer sailors heed this coaching, we can all have less stressful sailing.

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We all do out 'narna' occasionally and quite often it can be done in a humourous and entertaining manner. However, we must always be aware that we can be causing friction. It is a fine line. I greatly value the experienced sailors for their knowledge. I greatly value the newer sailors for they are our future and a pond with only one or two boats on it will please nobody.

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Again, my apologies to any newer sailors who, rightly, feel that I have not acted in a timely manner. I value your sailing.

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I also apologise to the experienced sailors for not giving more coaching to the newer guys so that potential conflicts would not arise.

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Please, everyone, take a deep breath, settle back and sail with courtesy and respect.

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The bottom line is that we are all supposed to be having fun.


A Class and Committee Meeting + BBQ

Posted by Graham Alcock on June 30, 2019 at 12:10 AM Comments comments (0)

A CLASS RACING      SATURDAY 6th JULY

This Saturday the 6th July 2019 will be an A class racing day and BBQ.

Other classes will race off the second start gun.

COMMITTEE MEETING

A Committee meeting will also be held during the lunch break.

CLUB MOTTO - REVISED

Posted by Terry Smith on April 30, 2019 at 12:50 AM Comments comments (2)

Hi Terry :-)

I think the expression you are looking for is

Ventis enim variabilis est stagnum ignis :-X

cheers

Graham A :-)

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Ave Graham, transferendum tu salutant.

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The phrase ‘Venti in stagnum, sit variabilis’ was produced by Google Tranalate. I had some reservations as to its’ accuracy.

Venti...............the wind

In.....................in/on

Stagnum.........the lake/pond

Sit....................let it be

Variabilis.........variable

This would be OK as an invocation to the gods i.e. ‘Let the winds on the pond be variable’, then sacrifice a goat/duck/virgin as appropriate. The problem then becomes, which of the Venti should we invoke; Aquilo, Auster, Vulturnus or Favonius? I would propose Favonius as he would give us our best sailing conditions. I really think that it would be better to separate our club from religion.

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The first thing that stands out with your phrase is the word ‘ignis’ which, as we all know, is fire.

Secondly, the verb ‘est’ is not at the end of the sentence.

Word by word your phrase comes out as

Ventis.............the winds

Enim...............for

Variabilis........variable

Est..................is

Stagnum........the lake/pond

Ignis............... fire

Or ‘For variable winds is the lake of fire’. Doesn’t quite trip off of the tongue. And we do not have a burn-off permit.

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The Latin that I learnt in high school would have the verb at the end of the sentence. I think that it should actually be ‘Venti in stagnum variabilis est’.

Venti...............the wind

In.....................in/on

Stagnum.........the lake/pond

Variabilis.........variable

Est....................is

‘The wind on the pond is variable’,

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iubentium,

Terry

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Should we add

MAXIME CIRCA MORTUOS LIGNUM

I am not sure of the latin for "Bob's Bastard Bouy

We were very short of virgins and goats.

It will have to be a duck.

Cheers

Graham A

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cave volantem per calceus

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Bob pila bastardis est

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STELLA TABULA !

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CLUB MOTTO

Posted by Terry Smith on April 21, 2019 at 8:15 AM Comments comments (0)

VENTI IN STAGNUM, SIT VARIABILIS

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And don't you forget it!

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HERSELF

Posted by Terry Smith on April 21, 2019 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)

Herself took off to Pomgolia for a couple of months. She went especially to see the Staffordshire Bull Terriers at Crufts. Unfortunately she was so disappointed with the standard of Staffies at the show that she went and watched at the Soft Coated Wheatens instead. I thought they were biscuits.

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I don't know what the big deal is with house-keeping. I slept on my side of the bed until the sheets were due to be washed and then I moved to her side. After an appropriate period I moved into the spare bedroom and that gave me another two weeks sleep. When I got down to sleeping in the swag it was time to do the washing.

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She came back and promptly took off to Hobart.

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On her return she stayed for a couple of weeks and is now in Mount Gambier - for another round of dogs shows.

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I am racking up no end of boat buying brownie points.

BOO !

Posted by Terry Smith on April 21, 2019 at 8:00 AM Comments comments (0)

Did I scare anyone?

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Things have been a bit hectic and whilst my mind and body have been on a go-slow strike.

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Hopefully, things will imorove.

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I've got a few things to sort out today regarding online picture storage, but after that all things should start coming back together.

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But..................................................Don't hold your breath.

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WORKS AND JERKS

Posted by Terry Smith on February 11, 2019 at 9:00 PM Comments comments (0)

TOILET FACILITIES

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Our toilet is almost ready to be re-commissioned. Mark kindly did our digging for us. We figured that the hole was deep enough when some Chinese guy at the bottom of the hole started complaining that the water was draining out of his rice paddy.

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We might ask The Toad to cut the ribbon at our AGM.

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DOCKLANDS

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While Mark had his Tonka Toy there he also re-arranged some of our beach in order to dredge ot Brian's Channel. When the water comes back Brian's Channel will again be available for navigation. We'll get Brian to cut that ribbon.

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We will be building a wharf area for the launching and retrieving of A Class boats. The Club has a couple of sleepers but more are needed. Before we go out and buy some, does anyone have any sleepers - timber or concrete - that they can spare?

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